Tag Archives: Women in science

ESOF 2014 Copenhagen Special Issue – Print Edition

What can a conference like this one bring to you? Those among our readers who have a sweet tooth will agree that such events can be compared to the cherry on the cake of academic life. Once every two years, it is time to enjoy a stimulating flow of discussions. Participants are guaranteed to have fruitful encounters with other people from various horizons. They may not be like-minded but, at least, share similar concerns about European science, policy or science communication. This is what ESOF 2014 is about! Read more [...]

Research funding gap: her excellence dwarfed by his excellence

Promoting excellence is an explicit goal in European and national research systems. As a result, various excellence-marked initiatives have been established across Europe. However, recent empirical studies and monitoring exercises outlined below show that these excellence initiatives have been more beneficial for male than female researchers. Moreover, this applies to excellence initiatives from organisations or countries with gender equality plans and monitoring practices in place. It even applies in countries with long-term gender equality interventions backed up by political will, such as countries in the Nordic region. Read more [...]

UNESCO maps out womens’ participation in science

Just 30% of the world’s researchers are women. While a growing number of women are enrolling in university, many opt out at the highest levels required for a research career. But a closer look at the data reveals some surprising exceptions. The UNESCO Institute for Statistics has just produced a new interactive tool related to Women in Science. It presents the latest available data on the status of women in research by region and country. Read more [...]

Science Career

Not having a defined career structure, is for many scientists in Europe today, a frustrating reality. This special issue of the Euroscientist explores key elements of the state of scientific careers in Europe to help our readers define their own career strategy. It features views from expert on how the changes in society, affected by both technology and the recession, are changing the nature of work practices. It also focuses on what remains to be done for scientists to be able work seamlessly across the European continent. And it also discusses issues facing those who wish to stay in academia and those who are seeking opportunities outside. Read more [...]

Do science girls have an image problem?

Is the image of women scientists to blame for the lack of popularity of science studies? And how much could changing the image of female scientists do to solve the two problems that persist? Namely, boosting girls’ involvement in science from an early age. And removing the barriers to top positions for female scientists when they get there. Find out more in this EuroScientist article. Read more [...]

Portugal: Filling up a glass that is already half-full

Early this year, the news hit the Portuguese scientific community as a cold blow: the national agency for science and technology FCT was unable to fund all of the research projects rated as excellent. Needless to say, this unprecedented event immediately caused uproar among researchers across all disciplines. But as often happens, where some scream outrage, others see a ray of sunshine. Read more [...]

More women scientists should make it in news

With more women in key positions in the media, there is a greater chance of increasing the portrayal of women scientists in the media. Women depicted as role models would help encourage more women in research. It may also help ensure that women increasingly reach position of leadership in research, following in the steps of prominent women scientists portrayed in the news. Read more [...]