Tag Archives: Women in science

A gender scholar’s visit to ESOF 2018: she came, she saw, she ranted

In this theory-informed auto-ethnographic account, I relate my experience of participating in the EuroScience Open Forum Conference 2018 (ESOF). Gender equality was certainly on the agenda at ESOF, however, I argue that the manner in which gender equality was addressed at the conference is not only problematic but potentially counter-productive to the intended purpose of promoting women in research careers. If we keep 1) essentialising a presumed lack of confidence to women, 2) omitting men’s role in the reproduction of gender hierarchies in research from equality discussions, and 3) excluding gender scholars’ expertise from gender equality debates, I fear that women’s equal participation in academic research and leadership will remain a distant prospect in the future still. Read more [...]

Family Friendly Research to boost Science Careers of Women

The balance between professional and personal life plays a key role for successful careers of European researchers, especially for women scientists. As far as employment and reconciliation of work and life are concerned, female employment rates remain low especially in Southern Europe and East Europe and in general even more for women with low education. Antidiscrimination laws have been adopted, but gender gaps are still large. Lack of child care services and care facilities for the elderly combined with rigid work arrangements make it hard to reconcile work and family life. Read more [...]

Gender Balance

Welcome to this special issue of EuroScientist focusing on Gender issues in research and academia. We have asked the views of Nobel Laureates, who have an interesting perspective on women in science. You will also discover a wealth of opinions describing what remains to be done to resolve gender issues. Not only do we discuss ways of resolving conscious and unconscious gender bias, but we also look at issues related to how gender perspective affects the nature of research itself. As for solutions, it appears that mentoring is one of the most helpful solution, beyond more interventionist approaches such as quota, which are controversial. Read more [...]

Gender bias: a ladder made for men

Gender bias, whether conscious or unconscious affects women at each level of academia. In this exploratory piece, EuroScientist explore the factors driving such bias and looks for solutions to remedy them. Find out more by reading the view of experts from across Europe and decide for yourself about the type of interventions that have been implemented to fight gender bias. Read more [...]

Progressive policies to improve the gender balance in scientific research

The Irish funding agency, Science Foundation Ireland, is at the forefront of progressive policies designed to improve gender balance in the research they fund. These policies have gradually been introduced to respond to a need to ensure that excellence--and not whether they are having children--is the only criteria determining women's chance of being funded. In this opinion piece, SFI's Fiona Blighe explains how the various schemes in place work. Read more [...]

Inadequate childcare policies affect scientists’ careers

The inadequacy of childcare policies across Europe, means that scientists who do not wish to be away from their lab for too long are struggling to balance their life as parents and as researchers. There are still some significant decisions concerning harmonisation of such childcare provision to be made in Europe, while further policy support would be welcome. Read more [...]

ESOF 2014 Copenhagen Special Issue – Print Edition

What can a conference like this one bring to you? Those among our readers who have a sweet tooth will agree that such events can be compared to the cherry on the cake of academic life. Once every two years, it is time to enjoy a stimulating flow of discussions. Participants are guaranteed to have fruitful encounters with other people from various horizons. They may not be like-minded but, at least, share similar concerns about European science, policy or science communication. This is what ESOF 2014 is about! Read more [...]

Research funding gap: her excellence dwarfed by his excellence

Promoting excellence is an explicit goal in European and national research systems. As a result, various excellence-marked initiatives have been established across Europe. However, recent empirical studies and monitoring exercises outlined below show that these excellence initiatives have been more beneficial for male than female researchers. Moreover, this applies to excellence initiatives from organisations or countries with gender equality plans and monitoring practices in place. It even applies in countries with long-term gender equality interventions backed up by political will, such as countries in the Nordic region. Read more [...]

UNESCO maps out womens’ participation in science

Just 30% of the world’s researchers are women. While a growing number of women are enrolling in university, many opt out at the highest levels required for a research career. But a closer look at the data reveals some surprising exceptions. The UNESCO Institute for Statistics has just produced a new interactive tool related to Women in Science. It presents the latest available data on the status of women in research by region and country. Read more [...]

Science Career

Not having a defined career structure, is for many scientists in Europe today, a frustrating reality. This special issue of the Euroscientist explores key elements of the state of scientific careers in Europe to help our readers define their own career strategy. It features views from expert on how the changes in society, affected by both technology and the recession, are changing the nature of work practices. It also focuses on what remains to be done for scientists to be able work seamlessly across the European continent. And it also discusses issues facing those who wish to stay in academia and those who are seeking opportunities outside. Read more [...]