Tag Archives: Social media

William Gunn: When technology shifts the academic balance

William Gunn is head of academic outreach for Mendeley. He views social networks as the skeleton which supports the flesh and muscle of more substantial online and offline interactions. In this exclusive interview to EuroScientist, he shares his views on how technology is influencing the research pace. I also talks about how social networks have facilitated increased collaborations in research, thus responding to the funders' requirements to produce research with the highest impact. Read more [...]

Online reputation: necessary, but not sufficient

Social connections, of course, are a key part of being a researcher—all the more so as science becomes increasingly collaborative. Much of scientific success—in both intellectual and career terms—is down to finding the right mentors and collaborators. Networks are a resource as much as any other. So how important to academic success is cultivating your profile online? Read more [...]

Mentors, mates or metrics: what are the alternatives to peer review?

You think that scientists, being quite clever people, would be able to agree on the best way to rank each other's work. Oh no, not any longer. For this article, the EuroScientist asked Science, Cell and Nature as well as eLife and independent commentators to go on the record with their thoughts on how they see the peer review system, as it stands, and what alternatives should be considered. Read more [...]

Christian Fonnesbech: Gaming calls upon science to enhance players’ experience

In an exclusive interview, Christian Fonnesbech, creative director at Investigate North tells the Euroscientist about the importance of science in his multimedia, social games.He has been involved in creating emotional narratives for the social media generation for over a decade. In this interview, he shares his views on education, while sharing his vision regarding the importance of science in gaming. Read more [...]

The iTunes for academic papers

When I decided to start my PhD, I knew that I’d be required to read and digest academic papers and that my research of these papers would build up into a literal library of knowledge. It is important to organise such a web of information, and I was concerned with how I might find a sufficient way to do so. Mendeley is the way that I found best to index my library. Read more [...]

Why scientists are waiting for Web 3.0

The Web in the 1990s, Web 1.0 you might call it, was all about content as everyone from shopkeepers to spectroscopists scrabbled to get online. The major scientific journals began their slow but steady adoption of the new access tools and community sites like ChemWeb and BioMedNet sprang up, endlessly mashing together capitalised prefixes and suffixes. Read more [...]