Tag Archives: Social media

Fake news: unobservant audiences are easily swayed

Fake news is everywhere. Science-related pseudo facts have taken over the gossip sites and social media. And we are only at the beginning of an uphill battle to set the record straight. In this contribution, Melissa Hoover, shares her investigation on how people's response to fake news makes it easier for such inaccurate stories to propagate at a rate that is way more important than fact-based news. And here is why... Read more [...]

Holding on to lies! Unlocking the cognitive mechanism behind misinformation

Five years ago, the World Economic Forum declared that the spread of misinformation through social media was one of the greatest global risks to our future and prosperity. At that time, the future scale of the threat was still unclear, even to media experts. However, for anybody with the slightest doubt about how rapidly social networks are changing news consumption and its effects, last year was eye-opening and overwhelming. Misinformation and fake news have influenced every major voting process and strengthened science-denial movements — consider how ubiquitous anti-vaccine and climate change scepticism propaganda is. But what are the consequences and the remedies to this? On the 29th of June, this and other questions are the subject of discussion in the 'Science journalism in a post-truth world’ session of the 4th European Conference for Science Journalists (ECSJ2017). Read more [...]

Thoughtful debate is losing ground over appearance

Science may be opening up, but there are still areas that researchers would like to see remain private. Indeed, under the auspices of open science, scientists are increasingly expected to present a virtual projection of who they are. Appearance has gained an unprecedented level of importance. Scientists who do not play along open themselves to being mistreated or misunderstood. Living in a world of social media network means that scientists’ every utterance is recorded, dissected and analysed. Unfortunately, researchers have come to this game unprepared and without the type of training that politicians typically benefit from. Nobel Laureate Tim Hunt has had a bitter experience in this new era. Read more [...]

Mark Pagel: We, humans, fantastic “karaoke singers”

“We are all singing somebody else’s songs.” With this image, Mark Pagel, evolutionary biologist at the University of Reading, UK, describes how difficult it is to be innovators. “We are followers, not innovators.” He is the author of a book on the subject called ‘Wired for Culture. The Natural History of Human Cooperation.’ Read more [...]

Why sharing matters

Welcome to this special edition of the EuroScientist looking into how sharing practices are affecting research and innovation. And why sharing matters! You will find, in our lead article, a wealth of information concerning the impact that the technology has had on sharing practices. We also look into the limitations of current sharing practices, despite the unprecedented availability of technologies to make collaborations happen. Read more [...]

Digitally-enhanced research has yet to become more collaborative

Sharing practices build the essence of science. In the process they generate two important “Rs” for scientists: recognition and reputation. This trend has been exacerbated by an increase scientific activity. This means they have the potential for enhancing the sharing practices associated with the scientific endeavour. Ultimately, this trend will also have an impact on the way research is translated into innovation, albeit at the cost of enhanced collaboration and at the detriment of competition. Read more [...]

Open Science – more than sharing

Tim Berners-Lee originally envisioned the World Wide Web to help scientists share their knowledge and results. Since then, it has turned into everything but a place for scientists. One of its primary uses is buying and selling goods and services of all kind. Of late, this gigantic virtual market place has also realised the perks of sharing rather than buying. In science, we’re on the forefront of a similar movement called Open Science. Read more [...]

William Gunn: When technology shifts the academic balance

William Gunn is head of academic outreach for Mendeley. He views social networks as the skeleton which supports the flesh and muscle of more substantial online and offline interactions. In this exclusive interview to EuroScientist, he shares his views on how technology is influencing the research pace. I also talks about how social networks have facilitated increased collaborations in research, thus responding to the funders' requirements to produce research with the highest impact. Read more [...]