Tag Archives: Science communication

Lorenz Adlung: slam poetry makes science more accessible

Lorenz Adlung did not go unnoticed when he took part in the March for Science in Heidelberg, on 22nd April 2017. In this interview, he shares his passion for communicating science in less conventional ways. He also explains his aspiration to associate a wider audience to his scientific journey, and argues why it matters that others follow suit. Included at the end are some samples in German and English of his poetic slams. Read more [...]

Contently’s Shane Snow: the key to using virtual soap boxes

Shane Snow is a freelance science and business journalist turned entrepreneur. In this interview with EuroScientist, he tells the story of how he co-founded Contently, a company initially created to help companies and brands to produce editorial and multimedia content telling their story. He also explains how the its business subsequently evolved into a technology company by incorporating the latest web tracking and analytics technologies to effectively distribute its content over the internet. Snow discusses the challenges of creating suitable content to help raise the profile of science, making a distinction between content that is promotional in nature and more critical journalistic content. Read more [...]

Top 10 YouTube science channels to enlighten and entertain

Thanks to YouTube it’s never been easier – or more entertaining – to learn about science. The EuroScientist team has browsed some of YouTube’s most popular and emerging science channels to bring you a list of our their ten favourites. This list is by no means exhaustive, so feel free to share your favourites in the comment box below! Read more [...]

Matters founder Lawrence Rajendran: the Lego approach to scientific publishing

In this interview with EuroScientist, Lawrence Rajendran explains why he created Matters, to change the way we communicate science. He has devised a new way of publishing science by submitting single observations to build the big Lego puzzle of science. He believes that the current way of presenting papers, based on storytelling, needs to be revisited as they tend to favour oversights of what could be perceived as negative results. He thinks this will to open science to allow greater multidisciplinary collaborations and to reach out to a wider audience, beyond the scientific community. Read more [...]