Tag Archives: Science communication

The problem with science comics: uncritical images and ideology of research

Academics are increasingly using comic books to teach and communicate science, even as strong, unbiased evidence of the effectiveness of doing so is missing. A recent review found that empirical research on the effectiveness of comics in science Read more [...]

Professor Balthazar: solving problems without inventions (plus, a full list of his many contraptions)

The image many of us have of Professor Balthazar is of him pacing up and down his study before rushing into the laboratory to start up his colorful invention machine. His “miraculous machine” then makes “one of his famous inventions”, and Read more [...]

ESOF2022

Europe's largest interdisciplinary science conference presented in a new, hybrid form for 2022 Science is spectacular. Science inspires, connects and challenges society. In a world that is in constant flux, sciences changes accordingly. What does that mean for your role as a scientist? How can you contribute to this change? Are you curious to see what science has to offer society? Do you want to help solving the challenges faced today? Then please join us at Europe’s biggest interdisciplinary science conference. Read more [...]

How do we get young scientists to communicate science?

In the words of one of the 2017 PhD European Young Researcher Award winners, a scientist’s life often means “no fixed working hours, being switched on always, and yet getting paid only when you have a grant or a scholarship.” This opinion piece by Satyajit Rout from Editage, a science communication services company that supports researchers and institutions drive real-world scientific impact, delves into the challenges facing young scientists and suggests what could be done to change the status quo. Read more [...]

All good things come to an end

The Cambridge Analytica scandal has shown that the work of scientists is not neutral. The work of psychologists who designed the questionnaire aimed at profiling Facebook users might have been stellar work in its own right, within the standards of the field. But the way the answers to the questionnaire were later used for the purpose of influencing the political choices of the Facebook users who took the questionnaire, is--to say the least--questionable. This scandal is a case in point to show that there is no better time to continue the dialogue of the role of scientists in society. After 5 years working as Editor of EuroScientist, I would like to announce that I am now moving on to pastures new. Read more [...]

ECSJ2017: Science Communication 5.0

EuroScientist is delighted to be able to share some of the discussions which took part during the 4th European Conference for Science Journalists in Copenhagen between 26th and 30th June 2017. They touched upon the evolving nature of science communication, how scientists are engaging with the public and issues related to evidence-based policy making. We would like to invite you to comment on individual articles using the dialogue box below each of the articles to continue the conversation. Read more [...]