Tag Archives: Open innovation

How ’Crowdsourcing’ involves experts and patients to define research missions: Broken Bone, anyone?

What if patients and clinical experts could spark and define the direction of multidisciplinary science projects without knowing the scientific literature? The Ludwig Boltzmann Gesellschaft (LBG) — a Austrian research organisation located in Vienna Read more [...]

Are the disruptions of uberisation a bane or boon for science?

For every characteristic of uberisation, there is a parallel in the world of research. This raises the question of whether research was "uberised" before Uber even existed? In this article EuroScientist explores which aspects in research have been most impacted by technology, and the challenges ahead to leverage uberisation for the good of science and scientists. Read more [...]

A crowdsourcing approach to innovation

I truly believe that, if people open up, collaborate and work together, they can achieve greater results than anyone working alone. This is why I have co-created Babele, an online crowdsourcing platform for business planning. The concept of Babele was the subject of my MBA thesis in 2009 in Brazil. My research aimed at drawing a roadmap on how to harness collective brainpower to innovate in the area of sustainability for the common good. For example, this could be achieved by developing projects aiming to achieve the triple bottom line of economic prosperity, environmental quality and social equity. Read more [...]

Open Innovation

Welcome to this special issue of the EuroScientist focusing on open innovation! This issue brings you a high-level perspective on the shift occuring within research that is bringing open science and open innovation. We then peer into the recipes that can make open innovation work in an industrial setting.This special issue also provides an opinion piece on what happens when the economic power has full control over research and innovation budgets,as is the case in Spain, the UK and Austria. And finally, we give the last word to evolutionary biologist Mark Pagel, who shares his views through a podcast on the nature of creativity. Read more [...]

Can national culture influence success in open innovation?

Cultural differences among nations are not to be taken lightly. Especially, when it comes to innovation. A debate related to the influence of culture on innovation started in the 1980s’. We now live in a world where globalisation and international collaboration increasingly shape research and innovation. It is still difficult to gauge how the advent of open innovation will be influenced by national cultures. Even though the jury is still out on this debate, one thing is certain: open innovation is not happening in a vacuum. Read more [...]

Interview: Sascha Friesike: how enhanced collaboration is shaping the research of the future

Sascha Friesike is a researcher at the Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society, in Berlin, Germany. His research interests are innovation and creativity, He currently leads a research group called Open Science, which represents a new approach towards research, knowledge and its dissemination. In this exclusive interview to the EuroScientist, he shares his views on how is the current research is changing, due to the influences of the internet. Read more [...]

A new model for open innovation: the Structural Genomics Consortium

Open innovation is often suggested as a solution to enhance productivity in under-performing areas of research. Now, the strengths and weaknesses of a new open innovation model in drug discovery have been evaluated. Our evaluation focuses on the model adopted by the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), a public-private, open access, not-for-profit organisation created in 2004. Read more [...]

Open innovation: an industrial perspective

Innovation can be broadly defined as taking new ideas profitably to market. The aspect of novelty is material to it, but so is the financial reward to successful inventors and entrepreneurs. In competitive markets, it is natural that private firms traditionally have preferred to safeguard their position by keeping innovation projects in house as much as possible. Read more [...]

Creating what we need from what we have—how innovation rescues traditional industries

In Europe, the word innovation is often associated with high-profile research and cutting-edge future technologies. It is particularly true in these recessionary times, where it is seen as a way out. However, innovation could also be used as a mean to secure the survival of traditional industries and that of modern industries in decline. Read more [...]

The end of the wage labour: what you know is who you know

Internships, short-term contracts, job hunting, race to publish, growing importance of network relationships. In recent years, the working condition of researchers has been completely transformed. In this open world context, the demand for individual autonomy fuels the competition between job candidates. As a result, research work and careers are no longer fostered in a sustainable environment. Above all, what matters today, is also their ability to enhance their network because in this new world, what you know is who you know. Read more [...]

Open innovation at your fingertips

Are you interested in getting help to further your research? For example, are you looking for funding or for strategic partners for a project? Do you need to get access to large amounts of relevant data? Do you wish at get in touch with lots of individuals who can contribute? To address all these issues relevant to researchers, there are a growing number of solutions available, gathered under the umbrella of open innovation. Read more [...]