Tag Archives: Open Access

Open access in Europe: the bear and the tortoise

A little over decade from now, we may look back at the era when scientific research was locked up behind paywalls with curious fascination. How could it be that publicly funded research could be withheld from the very people that funded it, namely the taxpayer? How could access restricted even to the people that utilised it most, scientists? And how could a cabal of global publishers rake in billions in profit through activities they had little or no part in supporting financially? EuroScientist looks at the way the field has evolved in Europe. Read more [...]

Open access sails on despite stormy waters

The voyage towards open access was never going to be easy, especially in a field as conservative as academic publishing. Of late the seas have been stirred to greater turbulence by the waves of activity spreading open access across the globe.The increasing apparent complexities surrounding open access can be off-putting. But given that the rise of open access publishing is now widely seen as inexorable it is more important than ever that researchers take the trouble to inform themselves about this issue. Read more [...]

Open access: an opportunity for scientists around the globe

Researchers face two problems related to information access: making their own research more visible to researchers elsewhere and making worldwide research readily available to them. Open access (OA) can solve both of them. Open access is particularly important in developing countries, where the research and higher education budgets are nowhere near those in advanced countries. Read more [...]

Open access: who should pay?

It’s been great watching the open access (OA) debate slowly but completely transform over the last two years. Back when I started writing about OA, the big question was still whether or not the world should go that route at all. At times it has felt like a long, hard road from there to here, but we now live in a world where the US and UK governments have both officially declared their support for universal OA, and Europe's Horizon 2020 research program will mandate OA, while the European Research Council strongly supports OA. The “whether to do OA” debate is over. Read more [...]

The hour of the amateur scientist – FTL neutrinos part 2

So. There have been lots of responses to my last article on the faster than light neutrinos. Some readers have asked me to explain to them the consequences of the measurement being correct. Others have been interested to hear more about the changing landscape of digital publishing. While a rare few were quietly satisfied with the idea that the neutrino result was well off being a ‘discovery’, and that we would have to wait patiently for a few years to find out what it might all mean. Read more [...]