Tag Archives: Innovation

Callinicus: the importance of scientists, knowledge, and innovation

The role that scientific advances and technological innovations play on the fate of civilisations is illustrated by numerous examples, including food-related developments (improved species in agriculture and livestock), health (hygiene and the discovery of antibiotics), and lifestyle (popularisation of the internet). However, none of these examples triggers immediate effects on the nation's evolution as those innovations related to military technology. Read more [...]

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Disruptive innovation requires humanities’ input

Disruptive innovation has to be accompanied by social and cultural progress. In the provocative opinion piece, Kirsten Drotner from the University of Southern Denmark and Mariachiara Esposito from Science Europe call for policy makers in Europe to abandon the prevailing approach to innovation that has informed European policies and funding programmes, in particular Horizon 2020. Instead, they call for a recognition of the role of arts and humanities research in fostering future innovation. Read more [...]

Gender Balance

Welcome to this special issue of EuroScientist focusing on Gender issues in research and academia. We have asked the views of Nobel Laureates, who have an interesting perspective on women in science. You will also discover a wealth of opinions describing what remains to be done to resolve gender issues. Not only do we discuss ways of resolving conscious and unconscious gender bias, but we also look at issues related to how gender perspective affects the nature of research itself. As for solutions, it appears that mentoring is one of the most helpful solution, beyond more interventionist approaches such as quota, which are controversial. Read more [...]

Entrepreneurship: the ‘she’ factor

In this opinion piece, Polish entrepreneurship expert Agnieszka Klucznik-Törő shares her view on how female entrepreneurship is changing across Europe. She argues that understanding it better is paramount in devising suitable support mechanisms for women involved. She refers to the on-line resource developed under the EU-funded WINGS project as an example of suitable solutions to help women entrepreneurs tackle typical challenges they face. Read more [...]

Time to recognise the influence of gender on research outcomes

The League of European Research Universities, LERU , launches today, 16th September 2015, a new report showing how Gendered Research and Innovation (GRI) can foster new knowledge and solutions to global challenges. And such challenges are not minor. Indeed, research failing to account for sex and gender specificities can put lives at risk and be costly. Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment is a US/EU initiative whose goal is to explore how gender analysis can open doors to discovery. Meanwhile, international, collaborations supported by the European Commission and the US National Science Foundation developed state-of-the art methods for sex and gender research. Read more [...]

Spring of discontent in the European science community

The new Juncker Commission is attempting to tackle the sluggish economic climate by introducing a punchy new plan. It involves the creation of the European Fund for Strategic Investment to invest in job creation and growth. This initiative has generally been welcome. Except that the proposal involves taking €2.7 billion away from Horizon 2020, the very programme supposed to produce the innovations that would contribute to the growth of the economy. This has triggered uproar in the European science community. This reaction was further compounded by criticism from the European Court of Auditors pointing to the many gaps in the proposed plan. Finally, additional concerns that further funding restrictions could be imposed on the way structural funds are permitted to be used have also emerged, given that research features low on the list of EC priorities. Read more [...]

Innovation: collaboration creed rather than mobility mantra

When it comes to mobility, Central and Eastern European scientists are among the champions. This has often resulted in an entire generational gap in their country’s scientific community. Now, some of the brainiest Eastern European scientists are doing research in the most dynamic research hubs in Western Europe, the US and Asia. And their home countries are left to pick up the pieces. Read more [...]