Scientists’ lifestyle

Issues related to the every day life of scientists when they are not working

Increasing awareness of researcher mental health

Recently, there has been an increasing amount of attention paid to the mental health of researchers. Research is an activity that aims to confront the boundaries of human knowledge: it demands excellence from all researchers, who aim to publish in peer-reviewed publications, submit grant applications, achieve tenure or defend a PhD thesis. Researchers identify with and are dedicated to their work to a very great extent. A recent report noted that researchers simultaneously demonstrate high levels of job satisfaction and high levels of stress and depression. Nevertheless, hard work does not have to lead to suffering. Read more [...]

The Blame Game

Science fiction authors are a motley crew, which includes a small number of professional scientists but also many others with no particular background in science or technology. EuroScientist published a short story called The Blame Game by Ian McKinley, who is a scientist involved in the rather esoteric area of radioactive waste management. In this story, a number of experts caught up in the chaos resulting from sudden environmental collapse argue about the root cause. The bottom line is that that there are so many interacting factors that it’s impossible to disentangle them. McKinley chose fiction as a means to talk to non-specialists about radioactive waste. He sets out to debunks the myths around the topic which stem from films, novels and, increasingly, comics, manga and anime, to get readers to ask themselves key questions about the topic. Read more [...]

Summer time: reflect, recharge and reconnect

2017, so far, has been an amazing year at EuroScientist as we are getting even more connected to our community of readers every day. For now, we hope that you will have time to reflect on your own life and recharge your batteries, during the summer. This could also be an opportunity to reconnect with the rest of our community by continuing to share and exchange through EuroScientist's comments boxes and social media networks or via the Homo scientificus europaeus community blog. We look forward to engaging with you again in September. Read more [...]

Raising hue and cry against a poet!

Censorship is alive and kicking. Read on about the experience of a French poet, who is also an eminent physicist, writing under the pen name Chaunes. His latest work include poems which refer to both the islamic veil and naked bodies in the same piece. Even tough few people actually read poetry. It appears that commercial online retailers have their own in-built censorship when it comes to such matters. Read more [...]

Champagne to celebrate the 2017 window on science, policy and society

On the eve of 2017, we raise a glass of champagne--now that scientists better understand what gives it all its flavour--and invite you to engage even more than before with EuroScientist. You may approach us to tell us about how your work is changing as our society and the wider research environment change. Tell us about how you interact with policy makers and with citizens. Tell us about your dreams and your ambitions. And don't forget to share our articles within your wider circles and to comments on the articles we publish. 2017: here we come! Read more [...]