Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI)

Everything related to Responsible Research and Innovation as known as “RRI”, a cross-cutting issue of Horizon 2020. Here we will answer how to align the outcomes of research with the values and needs of society.

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RRI: New buzzword or vision of modern science policy?

Science has the power to transform societies. It has the power to help tackle the challenges Europe is facing. Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) aims to reconcile the need for research to operate autonomously against a backdrop of society transformed by scientific discoveries and technical inventions. Thanks to RRI, we are getting one step closer to finding practical solutions to facilitate the dialogue between scientists and all those concerned, including citizens. Read more [...]

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RRI training by showcases

RRI has an air of deja vu, as the concepts behind RRI could transform the way that the research and innovation processes work, and bring their results much closer to what our fellow citizens really want and need. European funded project RRI Tools is rolling out a series of training workshops across Europe. In this opinion piece, Steve Miller, professor of science communication at University College London, UK, shares the lessons learned from previously tested approaches implemented by the UK EPSRC research council. Read more [...]

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Inspiring findings to expand the RRI scene

As the first few RRI projects are coming to fruition, there are plenty of lessons to be shared about how best to implement the European Union policies on responsible research and innovation. In this opinion piece, the coordinators of the Go4 group of RRI projects share their recommendations on how best include RRI practice into existing research and innovation activities. Read more [...]

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RRI Awards: recognising good practice

Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) is so new that it is not well documented and good practice has not been spread. It is, however, gradually pervading research and innovation culture and policy. As a means to spread such good practice, a pan-European group of science foundations have now created Awards for Responsible Research and Innovation. This article explores how this awards came about to stimulate people to introduce RRI aspects in their work. Read more [...]

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How citizens’ feedback can shape health research

Experts will discuss the latest research on healthy populations at the forthcoming EuroScience Open Forum event to be held in July 2016 in Manchester. The trouble is, until recently, often people who may be impacted by health research did not have a say in it. Several session organisers share their views on the new avenues that are explored to improve the link between health research and citizens. Read more [...]

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Launch of the RRI toolkit

Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) is too often no more than a cryptic acronym to many in European research circles. It is at times not quite clear how to implement it. Now, thanks to the results of the RRI Tools project, an RRI Toolkit is about to be launched this week. Don't hold back and feel free to explore all the available options. Read more [...]

Research can be more responsible with the right partner

The drivers leading to responsible research and innovation are poorly understood. Now, empirical work done in the EU project “Governance of Responsible Innovation” (GREAT) has investigated the factors influencing the uptake of responsible research aspects in EU-funded research and innovation using an agent-based simulation approach to analyse the impact of responsibility measures. Results reveal, for example, that the involvement of civil society organisations does not necessarily tilt the balance towards greater responsibility in research as initially thought. Instead, what appears to be of vital importance is the capability of any research partner to perform research responsibly. Read more [...]

Can society-oriented research be academically influential?

The dichotomy between research that aims at tackling specific societal challenges and blue sky research is not as wide as expected. A new Danish study on the impact of research funded by the last two framework programmes reveals that there may be no contradiction between research being challenge-oriented and being academically influential. This gives food for thought to steer future research policy. Read more [...]

The good scientist

The global professionalisation of science was initiated in the 20th century. It has resulted in the creation of the largest scientific community, the most widespread research facilities and in the widest dissemination of scientific knowledge to date. This may, at first sight, appear to be very positive news for science. Yet, the academic population grew extraordinary fast, in the past forty years. Read more [...]

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Tackling grand challenges with socially acceptable solutions

Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) encompasses a wide range of efforts. Their common objective is to tackle the grand societal challenges that Europe faces. To achieve this objective, the RRI strategy is to convey the processes of research and innovation towards socially desirable and acceptable solutions to these grand challenges. Read more [...]

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An abridged genealogy of the RRI concept

Responsible research and Innovation, or RRI, may not be well understood by some. Yet, what it means is: science policy should explicitly include society. It stems from the fact that resistance to technical progress has always existed, particularly when such new technology is disruptive. Those who, in the XIXth century, did not agree and contested the value of such progress were accused of adopting romantic attitudes, or of being irrational. Read more [...]