What makes universities attractive to international students?

Demand for university education is on the decrease, mainly due to demographic factors. This trend, combined with a rise in the breadth of diversity of the educational offer, has caused an increase in competition within the higher education sector of Western European countries. Competition is happening, both nationally and internationally. It is therefore essential to understand the factors determining the international demand for higher education. Read on…

Varvara Trachana: Innovative and competitive researchers: a must for society

In Greece, we have this unique and bizarre problem of the 750 faculty members hired but not appointed, and therefore being held as ‘academic hostages’. This situation is, unfortunately, taking place at the same time as the higher education and research systems are being subjected to attacks. We believe that in the difficult times that Greece and the rest of the south of Europe are facing, young, talented, innovative, highly-skilled and competitive researchers are the workforce society needs most. Varvara Trachana will take part to the forthcoming event entitled homo scientificus Europaeus: seeking a sustainable future for European science, which is due to be held at the Ateneu of Barcelona, Spain, on 8 November 2013 at 12.30.

Francesco Sylos Labini: Two cultural and economic growth factors: basic and curiosity-driven research

Today, ROARS is one the most important Italian forum for discussion on research and higher education policy. Its members believe that basic research and curiosity-driven research—in its broader meaning including humanities and social sciences—is an essential element for the development of the cultural and economic growth of a country. One of their co-founders and editor, Francesco Sylos Labini will take part to the forthcoming event entitled ‘homo scientificus Europaeus: seeking a sustainable future for European science,’ which is due to be held at the Ateneu of Barcelona, Spain, on 8 November 2013 at 12.30.

Open access: an opportunity for scientists around the globe

Researchers face two problems related to information access: making their own research more visible to researchers elsewhere and making worldwide research readily available to them. Open access (OA) can solve both of them. Open access is particularly important in developing countries, where the research and higher education budgets are nowhere near those in advanced countries.

Marie Curie: Inspiring millions, advancing European science

She received two Nobel Prizes, has served as an inspirational figure to countless women (and men) in science, and has a Continent-wide fellowship program named after her to promote the brightest scientific minds and innovations. The Marie Curie Fellowships, administered by the EU, are so prestigious that recipients regularly gush about its virtue as a career game-changer. Only 8% of applicants receive fellowships each year, but this low rate of acceptance does not deter scholars; on the contrary, says Jordi Curell Gotor, who oversees the Marie Curie Fellowships as Director Lifelong learning, higher education and international affairs, DG Education and Culture, European Commission. The number of applications continues to rise annually. So far, 50,000 researchers from 120 nations have received these prestigious grants since the program’s inception in 1996.

Croatian Science and University Legislation Ignites ‘Stormy’ Debate

Over the past few months, the academic and scientific communities of Croatia have been voicing their displeasure with proposed revisions to the national legislation governing the country’s universities and its science and higher education organizations. Critics have argued, for example, that the changes would take away university autonomy and freedom of scientific expression because universities and research priorities would come under direct governmental control.