March for Science: reaching out for bottom-up governance

We are living through very puzzling times. Times where the unexpected, the counter-intuitive and the irrational make headlines day after day. In this new world order, some remnants of old models of governance are re-emerging. These are entered on top-down governance, sometimes stretched to the point of generating strongly nationalist and authoritarian regimes. Yet, new governance models are needed. Scientists, with the March for Science due to take place on 22nd April 2017, give a strong signal, that bottom-up input into policy is needed. Unlike any time ever before, technology makes it easy for people in power to consult citizens on how their lives should be governed. Meanwhile, the input of the humanities and deeper philosophical questioning could help us inform future policy decisions. The trouble is that the mechanisms for such bottom-up governance have not yet been fully elucidated. To contribute to discussions on this issue, it is now time for EuroScientist and HSE community members to step in.

Top Trumped: what does the US election mean for science and Europe?

Donald Trump’s imminent arrival at the White House has blown a cold wind through the scientific community. In this article, Arran Frood, investigates the likely impact the Trump presidency could have on research in Europe. He also explores how a likely change in science policy in the US may result in a shift of the centre of gravity of research, particularly in certain disciplines. Finally, there could be some consequences for the mobility and career of scientists themselves.

First pan-African general science conference

Recently, the government of South Africa hosted the first pan-African general science conference, Science Forum South Africa, in Pretoria. The international attendance by participants from other African countries, and beyond, shows the renewed interest of the science community towards science in Africa. This event was a landmark in flagging up the political support bestowed upon science an for highlighting opportunities for international collaborations.

Climate diplomacy in full steam ahead of COP21

Climate change is on the mind of many scientists, beyond experts in the field. It is where science diplomacy has been at work in the month preceding the climate change conference, COP21, opening in Paris on 30th November 2015. But does science diplomacy make a difference? EuroScientist talks to various experts in the field and analyses the likely outcome of such talks.

The role of science in fostering a common good economy

As the forum of social and solidarity economy leaders, dubbed Rencontres du Mont-Blanc, is about to take place between 26 and 28 November 2015, in Chamonix, France, its president, Thierry Jeantet, calls for more scientists to be involved in the social and solidarity economy sector to try and find a virtuous path for growth, hinging on research and innovation.