ESOF 2014 Copenhagen Special Issue – Print Edition

What can a conference like this one bring to you? Those among our readers who have a sweet tooth will agree that such events can be compared to the cherry on the cake of academic life. Once every two years, it is time to enjoy a stimulating flow of discussions. Participants are guaranteed to have fruitful encounters with other people from various horizons. They may not be like-minded but, at least, share similar concerns about European science, policy or science communication. This is what ESOF 2014 is about!

Multiple perspectives matter in shaping science policy too

The most popular Danish cultural export in recent times is arguably the TV series Borgen. Outlining the intricacies of the mechanisms of democracy, the series follows Prime Minister Birgitte Nyborg in her rise and fallout from power. Scientific themes are pervading the series because science remains at the heart of many societal issues debated by politicians prior to translating decisions into policies that ultimately will affect citizens. Issues at stakes in the series range from the environment, with green power production, to agriculture, with intensive pigs farming.

Special Issue: Ethics – Print Edition

This post is designed to allow our readers to convert the full issue into a single PDF file, that can be read offline or in print. We are introducing such printer and tablet-ready version of the EuroScientist to respond to the expectations of our readers, who have expressed the need to access the magazine when they are not connected to the internet, so that they can read it at their leisure, while travelling for example. As a participatory magazine, we encourage you, our readers, to provide further feedback so that we can make the magazine more accessible and relevant to you.

Shrinking humans: an artist’s perspective on the sustainability challenge

The Incredible Shrinking Man is a speculative project that investigates the implications of downsizing the human species to better address the demands on the Earth. It has been a long established trend for people to grow taller. As a direct result we need more resources, more food, more energy and more space. At the dawn of agriculture about 10,000 years ago, an estimated 5 million people lived on Earth.

Science lobby set for verdict on Horizon 2020

The scientists’ group Euroscience, the European Research Council and the League of European Research Universities have renewed efforts in the face of funding fears. Scientists and university groups have launched a late push against cuts to the Commission’s plans for Horizon 2020, ahead of a meeting of EU leaders that could seal the next seven-year budget for research. They have made fresh pleas urging decision makers to secure a budget of at least €80 billion for Horizon 2020.