Montenegro seeks international science park investors

Montenegro’s science ministry is pushing ahead with plans for a science and technology park, despite initial calls for domestic proposals to invest in the park flopping. The government now hopes to reach out to international partners to invest in the science park. The park would link academia with industry as part of the country’s recent strategy to renew its science base and make it relevant to development.

Impact of the Census of Marine Life

The Census of Marine Life (CoML) programme addresses three major questions: What lived in the oceans? What lives in the oceans now? What will live in the oceans? This 10-year programme (2000–2010) is a unique global effort to develop the first comprehensive assessment of life in the oceans, from bacteria to large animals, from coastal and shallow waters to the poorly known habitats in the deep sea, through more than 500 expeditions. It has resulted in partnerships and an international network of over 2700 scientists from 80 countries. Through 14 field studies in distinct ocean realms, ranging from analysing historical documents to modeling future ecosystems, the Census enables scientists to describe the diversity, distribution, and abundance of life in the oceans, to compare what once lived in the oceans to what lives there now, and to postulate what will live there in the future.

Macs in science

As the Mac platform increases in popularity (Apple currently claim 20% of laptops sold are Macintoshes) it should come as no surprise that there are increasing numbers of students turning up to university with Macintosh laptops. Recent figures from the Apple-blogosphere suggest that around a quarter of new US students arrive with a machine running Mac OS X, and around half are planning on buying a machine from the company in Cupertino in the future. Some of these students will eventually make the move into postgraduate studies, and it makes sense that they’ll want to use the computers that they’ve become comfortable using. The Apple website has it’s own science section , with people using Macs to do everything from 3D medical imaging to submarine paleo-seismology.