How AI can enhance science’s most powerful tools

Artificial intelligence is a rapidly growing field of science and technology, yet the potential it holds for enhancing some of the world’s most powerful experimental tools such as neutron and x-ray probes is yet to be fully explored. Applying machine learning methods to processes within these international experimental facilities could help to overcome some of the biggest challenges faced by scientists today. This includes automating some of the handling, processing, and linking together of large datasets. At Institut Laue-Langevin, exploratory projects are already underway to ensure scattering science also reaps the benefits of artificial intelligence research.

Free to Think: Attacks on Scholars, Scientists threaten Societies Everywhere

Scholars at Risk’s latest Free to Think 2019 report describes the contours of a global phenomenon of attacks on higher education that impacts scientists everywhere. These attacks hamper scientific progress across the globe and challenge everyone’s right to think and share ideas. Given the gravity of this phenomenon, the report sets out tangible actions stakeholders including students, universities, faculty, and scientific associations can take to respond.

Applied mathematicians in the service of pressing global issues

Nowadays there is a diffuse border between pure and applied mathematics. The pure mathematician – an atypical scientist inclined toward the abstract – – is capable of switching at any time to the role of applied mathematician in order to address and solve the pressing global issues that threaten humanity. From assisting manned space missions to modelling the processes of ice melting or the spread of an epidemic, the applied mathematician’s contributions are crucial for humankind. The confidence we have in the truths of applied mathematics, which – within the philosophy of science – is part of the so-called Wigner’s puzzle, is a kind of evolutionary feature of the discipline.