Is Europe ready for citizen participation in science policy?

Science increasingly deals with challenges that concern society at large such as climate change, nanotechnologies, biotechnologies, demographic change or resource scarcity. But civil society participation in science, let along in science policy, has so far mainly been limited. Now, there is a will to increase citizen participation, in countries like Germany and others…

The German Science Debate: innovation with democratic participation

Science and technology are always intertwined with the economic and political system. Therefore it needs to be submitted to fundamental democratic procedures. For the upcoming federal elections in September 2013, the German Association of Science Writers TELI has launched a Science Debate . On its internet platform , every citizen is able to share a topic of concern. These will subsequently be discussed with experts.

Myths and misadventures of Spanish science

The financial crisis—in which we are still immersed—has brought back words such as cyclical and counter-cyclical; a terminology typically used by economists, independently their ideological or theoretical flavour. The problem with the current debate is that most of the discussions are about the economic aspect of the recession. Meanwhile, the concerns of citizens confronted to this economic context are diluted.

Video contest: Invest in our Future – Invest in Science

A group of scientists and science communicators based in Lisbon, Portugal, started a video contest with the goal of raising public awareness to the crucial role that science plays in our daily lives and in our future. The video contest, dubbed ’Invest in our Future – Invest in science’, invites you to look at the world afresh and realise the great contribution of science to our lives and the endless possibilities it opens for our future.

Europe sets the tone for long-term nuclear waste management strategies

Nuclear energy is at the forefront of many scientific minds these days. The Fukushima crisis shined a spotlight on possible dangers associated with the locations of nuclear plants, as well as the logistical and human health nightmares that can occur with meltdowns. But these aren’t the only concerns about nuclear power on which scientists are focusing. Nuclear waste management is also actively perplexing engineers, policy-leaders, and decision-makers, as the concern over how to best dispose of High Level Waste (HLW) continues to grow.