Science communication

How science can be communicated in new and innovative ways to diverse publics

Science & Machines exhibition

Handwritten correspondence with Albert Einstein, early x-rays and videos of 1930s operating theatres are among the documents brought together by the European Library in a virtual exhibition entitled Science & Machines - Scientific and technological development since 1800. This virtual exhibition brings testimonies to some of our own basic beliefs in the possibility of a better world to be constructed by man and make us reflect on the path taken by Western society and the future which may be in store. Read more [...]

Fukushima: science miscommunication by omission

Two years on from the disaster that struck Japan on 11th March 2011, there is much silence related to the scientific reality on the ground in Fukushima. One specific example of deliberate omission of scientific data is found in a multimedia site published by the French CNRS and intended for the general public, that does not reflect all currently available scientific data related to nuclear energy. Read more [...]

The three sources of distortion of science news

In the context of the relationship between science, media and ethics, there are three major players: news consumers, journalists and researchers. All of the actors in the chain are a potential source of distortion of science news. For more successful efforts to communicate science at a large scale, the science community may need to learn a bit more about the nature of the media. Read more [...]

More women scientists should make it in news

With more women in key positions in the media, there is a greater chance of increasing the portrayal of women scientists in the media. Women depicted as role models would help encourage more women in research. It may also help ensure that women increasingly reach position of leadership in research, following in the steps of prominent women scientists portrayed in the news. Read more [...]