Science communication

How science can be communicated in new and innovative ways to diverse publics

Hollyweird Science

There is an increase in popularity of Anglo-Saxon films and TV series featuring many kinds of scientists. In an opinion piece Kevin Grazier and Stephen Cass, authors of a recently published book on the topic, called Hollyweird Science, explain how Hollywood and major TV series representing scientists have come a long way. Scientists have never been portrayed more positively. Read more [...]

Noa Haim: everyone can play designer!

Noa Haim is a designer and an architect based in The Netherlands. She is the founder of the Collective Paper Aesthetics initiative, to create participatory construction toys. Her idea is to let anybody become a designer, thanks to simple shapes that can be assembled at will. In this opinion piece she reveals her philosophy at the interface between science and art. She shows how anybody can become an designer with no prior training—perhaps one of the best introduction to engineering and architecture the next generation could have. Read more [...]

When real science falls short in Hollywood

Portraying the lives of famous scientists for the big screen is a challenge very few directors manage without tweaking the truth for dramatic effect. Is such creative license justified by the need to convey the achievements of illustrious minds to those unfamiliar with science? Find out in this EuroScientist article exploring the mysteries of Hollywood. Read more [...]

The big boob persuasion: does it work for science, too?

Could using naked boobs help attract people's attention to science? The Tumblr blog Boobs for Science has just proved it’s no joke. It asks volunteers to send photos of themselves naked or wearing underwear, attaching a scientific statement of their choice. Some pictures are then published together with a concise scientific explanation on the chosen topic. The initiative was born in Italy, where the parent blog Tette per la Scienza has already made a splash and the Facebook page has gathered more than 20,000 fans since late October 2014. Read more [...]

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A regional science centre’s perspective on RRI Tools

How did we get involved in such an ambitious European project as RRI Tools? It all started when we were first approached by the European network of science centres and museums, Ecsite, to participate to a tender over a call pertaining to the production and use of a training and dissemination toolkit on responsible research and innovation. Read more [...]

Ready for third generation of science communicators?

Science is more politicised than ever. And its communication, in an increasingly diverse media environment, has become highly complex, often relying on dozens of experts in a single institution alone. As a result, science communicators need new management qualifications such as governance and controlling, public affairs and crisis management, risk communication and public engagement. It is about time that science communication training programmes catch up with the new science context. This is why, in September 2014, the first students will attend the newly launched undergraduate course in Science Communication at Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences (RWU), in Kleve, Germany. Read more [...]

Science Communication: putting the cart before the horse

A Danish research project on the so-called Nordic diet has raised concern about new trends in the way science is being communicated to the wider public, through untimely PR campaigns. The example of the OPUS Research Centre at University of Copenhagen, Denmark, stands out. This centre aims to investigate whether public health is likely to improve in Denmark, by renewing the Danish culinary culture. The trouble is that it started its promotional activities before any research findings had been published. Read more [...]

Fostering the adaptive creative thinker in every child

To succeed in today’s knowledge-based and creative society, children must learn to think creatively, plan systematically, analyse critically, work collaboratively, communicate clearly, design iteratively, and, above all, learn continuously. Unfortunately, most uses of technologies today do not support these 21st-century learning skills. Read more [...]

The case for fostering school-industry collaboration

A recent report points to the future labour market as being characterised by a quantitative and qualitative mismatch of skills. This means that there will be fewer workers than jobs in the future. And the skills of the workers will not match the required skills for these jobs. STEM has therefore become a key priority in western governments’ policy agenda. To remedy this situation, some advocate the benefits of partnerships between industry and schools on increasing the attractiveness of STEM education. Read more [...]