Science communication

How science can be communicated in new and innovative ways to diverse publics

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A regional science centre’s perspective on RRI Tools

How did we get involved in such an ambitious European project as RRI Tools? It all started when we were first approached by the European network of science centres and museums, Ecsite, to participate to a tender over a call pertaining to the production and use of a training and dissemination toolkit on responsible research and innovation. Read more [...]

Ready for third generation of science communicators?

Science is more politicised than ever. And its communication, in an increasingly diverse media environment, has become highly complex, often relying on dozens of experts in a single institution alone. As a result, science communicators need new management qualifications such as governance and controlling, public affairs and crisis management, risk communication and public engagement. It is about time that science communication training programmes catch up with the new science context. This is why, in September 2014, the first students will attend the newly launched undergraduate course in Science Communication at Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences (RWU), in Kleve, Germany. Read more [...]

Science Communication: putting the cart before the horse

A Danish research project on the so-called Nordic diet has raised concern about new trends in the way science is being communicated to the wider public, through untimely PR campaigns. The example of the OPUS Research Centre at University of Copenhagen, Denmark, stands out. This centre aims to investigate whether public health is likely to improve in Denmark, by renewing the Danish culinary culture. The trouble is that it started its promotional activities before any research findings had been published. Read more [...]

Fostering the adaptive creative thinker in every child

To succeed in today’s knowledge-based and creative society, children must learn to think creatively, plan systematically, analyse critically, work collaboratively, communicate clearly, design iteratively, and, above all, learn continuously. Unfortunately, most uses of technologies today do not support these 21st-century learning skills. Read more [...]

The case for fostering school-industry collaboration

A recent report points to the future labour market as being characterised by a quantitative and qualitative mismatch of skills. This means that there will be fewer workers than jobs in the future. And the skills of the workers will not match the required skills for these jobs. STEM has therefore become a key priority in western governments’ policy agenda. To remedy this situation, some advocate the benefits of partnerships between industry and schools on increasing the attractiveness of STEM education. Read more [...]

Making the long tail of scientific resources mainstream

Massive amounts of culturally and scientifically-rich content is now available. However, its potential use for educational and scientific purposes remains largely untapped. One reason can be seen in current web content dissemination mechanisms, which are dominated by a small number of large central hubs. In order to maintain their valuable services, those large hubs have to focus on commercially viable mainstream content. While cultural and scientific resources provide valuable and educational content they cannot be considered mainstream. Quite the contrary. Most of this can be considered as high-quality niche content for a rather small community and forms part of the so-called Long Tail. Read more [...]

When magic stimulates science education

How can a bowl of water vanish from under a cloth, and what does this magic trick have to do with science education? Harnessing the emotional power of magic, myth and mystery is one of the latest trends in science education. Many barriers to learning through enquiry currently exist. Foremost among these are a crowded curriculum with little time to deviate from the directed path. And the challenge of training students to take more responsibility for their own learning. For teachers, enquiry means coping with the often unexpected directions of students thinking. Read more [...]

What brings science, drama, controversy and innovation together?

The European Science TV and New Media Festival is an annual festival organised by EuroScience, the European Association for the Promotion of Science and Technology, and EuroPAWS, the European Public Awareness of Science and Technology. The festival was first launched in 2001 and held in different European cities such as Paris, Milan and London. Read more [...]

Do science girls have an image problem?

Is the image of women scientists to blame for the lack of popularity of science studies? And how much could changing the image of female scientists do to solve the two problems that persist? Namely, boosting girls’ involvement in science from an early age. And removing the barriers to top positions for female scientists when they get there. Find out more in this EuroScientist article. Read more [...]

Video contest: Invest in our Future – Invest in Science

A group of scientists and science communicators based in Lisbon, Portugal, started a video contest with the goal of raising public awareness to the crucial role that science plays in our daily lives and in our future. The video contest, dubbed ’Invest in our Future – Invest in science’, invites you to look at the world afresh and realise the great contribution of science to our lives and the endless possibilities it opens for our future. Read more [...]