Science communication

How science can be communicated in new and innovative ways to diverse publics

The problem with science comics: uncritical images and ideology of research

Academics are increasingly using comic books to teach and communicate science, even as strong, unbiased evidence of the effectiveness of doing so is missing. A recent review found that empirical research on the effectiveness of comics in science Read more [...]

Professor Balthazar’s biggest flops: how the cult 1960-70s Yugoslav animation series portrayed failure in science

Some of professor Balthazar's many frustrations If you’ve ever watched or heard of Professor Balthazar, the lead character of the eponymous cult Yugoslav animation series from the 1960-70s, you likely think of him as a successful inventor whose Read more [...]

How to give credit to scientists for their involvement in collecting, curating and publishing data & samples

Stemming from initial discussions by the Research Data Alliance Interest Group: Sharing Rewards and Credit, this session was developed to explore the problems and solutions around crediting scientists for sharing their data and other research outputs. Accordingly, we gathered together a group of experts to hear about their experiences in policy-making and metrics, and discuss some possible next steps. Read more [...]

How do we get young scientists to communicate science?

In the words of one of the 2017 PhD European Young Researcher Award winners, a scientist’s life often means “no fixed working hours, being switched on always, and yet getting paid only when you have a grant or a scholarship.” This opinion piece by Satyajit Rout from Editage, a science communication services company that supports researchers and institutions drive real-world scientific impact, delves into the challenges facing young scientists and suggests what could be done to change the status quo. Read more [...]

Media in the age of Artificial Intelligence

On 21st November 2017, the European Parliament Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) office hosted its annual lecture, chaired by Eva KAILI, MEP and STOA Chair and introduced by Carlos MOEDAS, European Commissioner for Research, Science & Innovation. The Keynote Lecture: How AI and algorithms manage flows of information was delivered by Nello Cristianini, professor of Artificial Intelligence, at the University of Bristol, UK. Read more [...]