Environmental impact of transportation on Europe: view of science and industry

Climate change is a fact and all of us should be concerned about it. One of the main causes of climate change is the human-caused environmental impact, especially in developed countries like Europe or North America. A number of European companies and institutions are determined to give an example to the whole world and stop the increase of emissions produced on the continent. Transport accounts for a fourth of global CO2 emissions and it is one of the few industrial sectors where pollutant emissions are still growing. Our generation has a chance to stop this trend and build a better future for our children.

Smart transport: looking to a safer and greener future

Smart transport is the incorporation of modern technologies into our transport and logistics sector. Advancements in space data and satellite technologies have huge potential to improve transport infrastructure, making it more efficient, cost-effective and sustainable. Public investments in space technology have already resulted in useful improvements in this sector, however there is a lot more to come. In this article, we present some of the leading projects using space enabled technologies to improve road safety, deliver goods efficiently and revolutionise public transport. Through funding and support, our transport system can become safer, more user friendly and kinder on the planet.

The Internet of Toys: The digital lives of young children

Communication technology is a daily reality for many young children in the form of internet-connected toys and devices: the Internet of Toys. Although these offer real benefits for children, they also present hidden risks, notably relating to privacy. To better understand the challenges presented by toys and devices for children aged 0–8 years, the European Cooperation in Science & Technology (COST) programme initiated an Action to develop an interdisciplinary network for researchers to share information and knowledge: The Digital Literacy and Multimodal Practices of Young Children (DigiLitEY). Outcomes of this COST ACTION are presented at the 4th European Conference for Science Journalists (ECSJ).

Prices: numbers that don’t fit

This article has been produced as part of a data journalism initiative called ‘Medicamentalia – Vaccines ‘ brought to you by the Civio Foundation. It outlines some of the successes in vaccination campaigns from governments across the world. It also gives you a historical perspective on the key scientists who have been instrumental in developing vaccines of the past centuries. Find out more, it makes for an insightful reading.

Vaccination levels: holes in the shield

The measles vaccine was invented in the 1960’s, and by the 1980’s its use was widespread. Decades later, however, the disease persists. Half of the countries in the world do not achieve immunisation rates sufficient to curb the transmission of illnesses such as measles. Similar scenarios apply to the polio and DTP vaccines. Find out more about the actual variying levels of vaccination uptake from around the world. In this piece of data journalism brought by the Civio Foundation, evidence shows that many avoidable diseases could reduce mortality, should countries implement suitable vaccination policies. There is still a long way to go to reduce avoidable death, preventable through vaccination.