How AI can enhance science’s most powerful tools

Artificial intelligence is a rapidly growing field of science and technology, yet the potential it holds for enhancing some of the world’s most powerful experimental tools such as neutron and x-ray probes is yet to be fully explored. Applying machine learning methods to processes within these international experimental facilities could help to overcome some of the biggest challenges faced by scientists today. This includes automating some of the handling, processing, and linking together of large datasets. At Institut Laue-Langevin, exploratory projects are already underway to ensure scattering science also reaps the benefits of artificial intelligence research.

The new Yellow-Green Italian Government

There is a refreshing new tone both in the Italian Parliament and Government. A rejuvenated politics, with a shot of populism generated a government of Parties bitterly opposing until the very last minute. The new, Yellow-Green Government, known as “Government of change”, is leaded by a coalition between the two Parties “League” and “Five Stars Movement”; they signed a “Government contract” of about 50 pages and 30 points. We do some considerations on the Research strategy proposed in the contract with specific attention to human resources in research. Talents attraction represents a point of concern. A short comment on Trieste ESOF is also included.

When privacy-bound research pays for open science

Thanks to the growing uberisation of science, opportunities to participate in world class research could soon no longer be limited to researchers in well-funded labs. According to an opinion piece by Barend Mons, professor at the Leiden University Medical Centre, The Netherlands, technology has now made it possible to distribute part of the interpretation of scientific results across a geographically widespread work force, to include scientists from developing countries. In the first of a two-part contribution, he also envisions that a new business model allocating free access to those who share, and charging a premium to those who don’t, could soon disrupt research and innovation and further open science.

This article is sponsored by
ESOF 2016
Find out how to become a sponsor

ESOF 2016 champion Nancy Rothwell

ESOF is a biannual event. And this year, it will be held in July in Manchester. Known for its manufacturing past, its footballing present and its graphene future, this vibrant city in the Northwest of England offers more than meets the eye. It is also the perfect location for an international forum such as ESOF2016. Find out more about what you can expect at this year’s event from its champion: Nancy Rothwell.

ScienceOpen: the next wave of Open Access?

The internet is transforming the way researchers communicate. And the pace of change is increasing. A number of issues have arisen under increasing public scrutiny. These include peer-review transparency, open data, evaluation of research impact—both based on articles and authors—as well as research reproducibility. At the same time, demand for real time Open Access (OA) to the latest scientific and medical results has rocketed.

Online reputation: necessary, but not sufficient

Social connections, of course, are a key part of being a researcher—all the more so as science becomes increasingly collaborative. Much of scientific success—in both intellectual and career terms—is down to finding the right mentors and collaborators. Networks are a resource as much as any other. So how important to academic success is cultivating your profile online?