Brain drain reversal requires counter-intuitive support measures

Reversing the brain drain from Eastern Europe may require a bit of counter-intuitive intervention. Instead of supporting the best brains from Eastern Europe to work in Western Europe, why not do the opposite? In this opinion piece, Gergely Buday, an academic in Eastern Hungary, shares his views on the best use of European funding to build expertise on the regions that need it most in Europe.

What does it take for brain drain reversal initiatives to be effective?

After the fall of the iron curtain 25 years ago, many scientists left Eastern Europe. The exodus peaked early in the 1990s. Yet, new emigration flows stemmed from the 2004 EU enlargement to ten countries including the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia. Further emigration arose as Bulgaria and Romania joined the EU in 2007.

Case study of brain drain from Spain to Germany: a reversible process?

The first time that I travelled to Germany was in the Spring of 2004. A few years before the actual financial crisis started. For this trip, I mainly packed three things in my suitcase: a degree in chemistry, several books to refresh my German and the need to see the world with my own eyes. One month later, I returned to Spain with some extra luggage: a climatic and cultural shock, the confirmation that my German was not as good as expected and an offer letter to do a PhD at the Technical University in Berlin.

Assumption, Perception, and Opinion: The Art of Discernment

Do you really know what causes you to formulate the beliefs you hold dear? Would it surprise you to learn that you’re not in full control? As human beings, we are wired to construct our opinions in highly specific ways—and more often than not, evolution wins out over conscious decision-making. Read on to examine exactly how this occurs, and find out what you can do to regain sovereignty over your own perceptions, assumptions, and life choices. Think you’re the only one in charge? Not so fast…for all of us, there are forces at play that merit a deeper look.

A new kind of science: research in the age of big data

What is unique about research in the era of Science 2.0? For one, it opens up important new methods of discovery. But the potential gains offered by technology can only be fully realised if research becomes open. This requires scientists to share more than ever before. And this calls for a system where all contributions, down to the most minute, are given proper credit. Welcome to the era of the fourth paradigm of research!

Kamila Markram: changing the way academics work

In this exclusive interview with EuroScientist, Kamila Markram explains how Frontiers, the open access academic publisher she co-founded is designed to remedy some of the shortcomings of the current academic publishing process. She talks about reinventing peer review by making it possible to exchange views, introducing altmetrics and making science attractive to young minds. She also introduces Loop, a social media network for scientists designed to be integrated wherever scientists are present, in places such as online publications and universities web sites.