Displaced Migrants in Higher Education: Findings from a study on Pathways and Support

In January 2018 the University of Manchester and MCAA launched a survey on the practices and attitudes in higher education institutions with regard to displaced students and academics. The aim of the survey was to identify the best practices to integrate displaced students and academics into higher education institutions. Together with previous work, the current study highlights the need to raise awareness among researchers and institutions about the various existing practices adopted in Europe to integrate displaced students and academics.

Regional Cooperation Council adopts ambitious research and higher education goals

Several initiatives on research, innovation and higher education have found their way into the next two years’ (2014-2016) workplan of the Regional Cooperation Council (RCC) – a regionally owned and led framework for the promotion of cooperation in South Read more […]

Research and education budgets in shambles in Denmark and Finland

Recent changes in the political landscape in Northern Europe have brought some new policies that are less supportive of science and education than previously. This is a major shift for Denmark and Finland, which have until now invested 3% of GPD in research and development. Time will tell whether such research and education cuts are a mere bleep on these countries record, or whether they will bear long-term consequences.

European Elections: much general talk, few concrete education and research proposals

In the past few weeks, European elections debates to elect members of the European Parliament (EP) have been in full swing. The vote will take place between of the 22nd to 25th May 2014, depending on the country. In most territories, the mainstream press appears to have little concern over higher education, research and innovation. It is also worth distinguishing the debate taking place in academic and research circles. There, the debate is only touching a few of the issues pertaining to research and education that would need to be addressed.The EuroScientist following its vocation as a participatory magazine, has called upon its network of loyal readers, supporters and reporters to gather an overview of issues that are relevant to scientists debated during the various campaigns across Europe.

If research and education is expensive, try ignorance

A recent panel discussion discussed the necessary steps that need to be taken to lead Europe out of the recession. It was held at an event entitled “homo scientificus Europaeus: the search for a sustainable future for European science,” held at the Ateneu of Barcelona, in Spain, on 8th November 2013. It brought together some of Europe’s most active scientists committed to the defence of the science on the continent.

Open education: an opportunity for South Africa’s science education

As a country nearing 20 years of democracy, South Africa is still redressing massive historical inequity. This is glaringly obvious in its education system. With the right to a basic education for all enshrined in the country’s constitution, the limited supply of resources and infrastructure afforded to many schools and even some universities is not keeping pace with the high demand. Now open education is starting to make a difference.

When magic stimulates science education

How can a bowl of water vanish from under a cloth, and what does this magic trick have to do with science education? Harnessing the emotional power of magic, myth and mystery is one of the latest trends in science education. Many barriers to learning through enquiry currently exist. Foremost among these are a crowded curriculum with little time to deviate from the directed path. And the challenge of training students to take more responsibility for their own learning. For teachers, enquiry means coping with the often unexpected directions of students thinking.

Is the new French research and education reform going far enough?

The Euroscientist looks into the details of the proposed French reforms on of Universities and Research. Some minor aspects of the law have been widely debated in the public sphere, whereas the in-depth changes it brings to the research and education system have unsettled its stakeholders across the political spectrum. Between past legacy and future needs, the new law appears to have reached the only politically acceptable compromise.

Free to Think: Attacks on Scholars, Scientists threaten Societies Everywhere

Scholars at Risk’s latest Free to Think 2019 report describes the contours of a global phenomenon of attacks on higher education that impacts scientists everywhere. These attacks hamper scientific progress across the globe and challenge everyone’s right to think and share ideas. Given the gravity of this phenomenon, the report sets out tangible actions stakeholders including students, universities, faculty, and scientific associations can take to respond.