The verdict is in from the European Digital City Index

Innovation hubs have now been mapped out in Europe; And their relative strengths identified. Nesta’s 2016 European Digital City Index (EDCi), is a composite indicator which measures the receptiveness of cities across Europe for young digital firms. These indicators include access to funding, business environment and the prevalent entrepreneurial culture in each city. London, Stockholm, Paris, Amsterdam and Helsinki round out the top five spots. Meanwhile, Berlin, Barcelona, Copenhagen, Dublin and Vienna comprising the top ten. Find out more about the role that local conditions can play in encouraging the entrepreneurship and scaling-up of innovative businesses.

Privacy: an endangered species in a digital world

Surveillance and security technologies do not exist in a vacuum. This is why it matters to study societal impacts and compliance with fundamental rights and values of citizens. Find out the perspective of Johann Čas, an economist from the Institute of Technology Assessment, at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, in Vienna. In an opinion piece, he talks about the findings of one of his latest projects, SurPRISE, which consulted 2,000 European citizens on their views of different security technologies and surveillance measures. This lead to interesting finding on what is acceptable to them in terms of security versus privacy trade-off.

Digitally-enhanced research has yet to become more collaborative

Sharing practices build the essence of science. In the process they generate two important “Rs” for scientists: recognition and reputation. This trend has been exacerbated by an increase scientific activity. This means they have the potential for enhancing the sharing practices associated with the scientific endeavour. Ultimately, this trend will also have an impact on the way research is translated into innovation, albeit at the cost of enhanced collaboration and at the detriment of competition.

How AI can enhance science’s most powerful tools

Artificial intelligence is a rapidly growing field of science and technology, yet the potential it holds for enhancing some of the world’s most powerful experimental tools such as neutron and x-ray probes is yet to be fully explored. Applying machine learning methods to processes within these international experimental facilities could help to overcome some of the biggest challenges faced by scientists today. This includes automating some of the handling, processing, and linking together of large datasets. At Institut Laue-Langevin, exploratory projects are already underway to ensure scattering science also reaps the benefits of artificial intelligence research.