Tackling Europe’s biggest healthcare challenges

The Wild Card initiative, launched this month by EIT Health, seeks to engage the biggest and brightest minds in implementing ground-breaking and high-risk ideas in healthcare. The two areas of focus for 2018 are: application of artificial intelligence and big data to diagnostics and finding non-pharmaceutical solutions to antibiotic resistance. In this inspired opinion piece, Jan-Philipp Beck, COO at EIT Health, who is based in Munich, Germany, tells us about the main challenges ahead to find solutions to these issues.

Emmanuelle Charpentier: the strings attached to CRISPR/Cas9 success

Finding reliable funding in the course of a scientific career is difficult, even for the best scientists, says Emmanuelle Charpentier, head of regulation and infection biology at the Max-Planck-Institut in Berlin, Germany. Better known for her work on developing the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technique, she calls for an informed debate on the implications of her work and wishes to avoid giving into the media buzz without more in-depth reflection. In this first of a two-part series, Charpentiers shares her perspective in an authentic way.

Thomas Landrain: short-circuiting research

In this interview with EuroScientist, Thomas Landrain explains the story of La Paillasse, the open lab he founded in Paris six years ago. He has since developed a platform aiming to do open science by involving academics from across disciplines, engineers, designers and artists as well as curious citizens from around the world. The idea is to cut out the intermediaries and create a much more open way of doing research, enabling to fast-prototype solutions to scientific problems.

Special Issue: Ethics – Print Edition

This post is designed to allow our readers to convert the full issue into a single PDF file, that can be read offline or in print. We are introducing such printer and tablet-ready version of the EuroScientist to respond to the expectations of our readers, who have expressed the need to access the magazine when they are not connected to the internet, so that they can read it at their leisure, while travelling for example. As a participatory magazine, we encourage you, our readers, to provide further feedback so that we can make the magazine more accessible and relevant to you.

Have we reached the twilight of the fundamental science era?

History reveals a succession of many dawns and twilights, in different facets of human activity. Looking at the past, we can date and understand the reasons for the birth of science, specifically fundamental science. However, we do not know precisely when its twilight will take place. Nevertheless, clues of the advent of such twilight are already in the air. This article presents the underlying rationale suggesting that we are now past the golden age of pure science, and how we need to accommodate our research to this new era.

The GM debate in Europe: stalled for good?

This article peers into the history of technology that brought genetically modified organisms before looking into current European attitudes towards GMO food products. It looks at the various stakeholders responses over the years, which have led to the current status quo over approval of new GMO varieties in Europe. And now, the debate appears to be stalled, as the GM products currently in the pipeline are progressing through the system at a snail’s pace .

A chemical Christmas

The Christmas meal in Britain usually centers on turkey, in Denmark roast pork. The French penchant is for goose, while Germans may opt for suckling pig. Regardless of the fleshy focus, a feast of culinary chemistry is at play when you prepare and cook the big meal. However, if you don’t get the chemistry right there’s more to worry about than dry meat and vegetables when the microbiology is dished up.