Podcast: How open science could benefit from blockchain

Find out from four experts how blockchain technology is likely to change the way scientists work. Some focus on the impact of blockchain-based cryptocurrencies in the financing of research while others analyse the way blockchain can improve the quality of the research itself by increasing its reproducibility. Clearly, blockchain has so many potential applications that we are only just opening the door to its many potential disruptions in professional research circles.

A pan-European Scientists’ Community Promoting an Open Science in an Open World

The 2nd Homo scientificus europaeus Meeting will be organised at the Ateneu Barcelones on 16 May 2017. Its aim is to foster the creation of a large pan-European community of citizen-scientists supporting the new social contract between science and society. In the morning, representatives of grassroots associations and organisers of March-for-Science from across Europe will discuss national initiatives. They will lead to discussions about their convergence. The afternoon will focus on the concept of Science Open to Society and will feature scientists from Barcelona. The meeting, which will be streamed live on the internet to ensure a broad reach. It will conclude with a general debate on how to proceed for promoting an Open Science in an Open World.

Jean-Claude Burgelman: the new open science paradigm requires fine tuning

The EC consultation on Science 2.0, whose results have recently been published, raised a number of issues that may need to be addressed before the idea of open science can fully be implemented. In particular, the need to introduce incentives in the scientific process to encourage scientists to share their data and publish in open access journals was brought up by many of the stakeholders consulted. He also sees the role of the Commission as that of a broker to create a level playing field to make it possible for open science to flourish.

Open Science helps researchers get the impact they deserve

Scholarly publishing is moving towards increased openness and transparency. Yet, scientists face many choices when publishing their work in academic journals—particularly with the rise of mega-journals—and this is changing the dynamic of the ‘publish or perish’ game. In fact, the recent developments make it easier for researchers to publish all their work with wider reach and improved lifespan, so that the science community make optimal use of all findings. This ultimately will only increase an article’s overall impact.

Open Science – more than sharing

Tim Berners-Lee originally envisioned the World Wide Web to help scientists share their knowledge and results. Since then, it has turned into everything but a place for scientists. One of its primary uses is buying and selling goods and services of all kind. Of late, this gigantic virtual market place has also realised the perks of sharing rather than buying. In science, we’re on the forefront of a similar movement called Open Science.

Collaborative open science speeds up research evaluation

Science is changing. The widespread reach of the internet means we can access more papers and connect with more researchers than ever before. With the growing adoption of open access policies around the world this trend is only set to increase. As a result, scientists’ ability to collaborate effectively over long distances is now a key challenge for scientists at all stages of their career.