How AI can enhance science’s most powerful tools

Artificial intelligence is a rapidly growing field of science and technology, yet the potential it holds for enhancing some of the world’s most powerful experimental tools such as neutron and x-ray probes is yet to be fully explored. Applying machine learning methods to processes within these international experimental facilities could help to overcome some of the biggest challenges faced by scientists today. This includes automating some of the handling, processing, and linking together of large datasets. At Institut Laue-Langevin, exploratory projects are already underway to ensure scattering science also reaps the benefits of artificial intelligence research.

Why Growing Crops under Solar Panels is the cross-sector Synergistic Solution we need on our way to achieving several SDGs

Agrivoltaics might just be the redemptive cooperation that would salvage humanity from the ill-thought pursuit of indiscriminate competition. This adaptable, integral solution has the potential to not only make economic pursuits sustainable in general but also help achieve individual self-sufficiency and energy independence.

Claude de Loupy: the era of hyperlocal news

We are soon to benefit from the availability of hyperlocal news. News about the local sports team, our local weather, average prices of houses in our locality, etc. This is the perfect illustration of how technology will serve the needs of citizens in a way that was never possible before. Today, most news report are relevant to entire regions or nations, or have an international dimension. But news that are only relevant to the locality where people live are too costly to produce via traditional means, using journalists. Instead, Claude de Loupy, CEO of French startup Syllabs, explains how robots capable of writing hyperlocal news report by making sense of automated wheather, sports and other automated data reports, are already available.

Predictions for the lab of the future

There are so many innovations waiting to serve scientists that it is quite incredible they have not been adopted sooner. In this insightful opinion piece, Simon Bungers, co-founder of labfolder, an electronic laboratory notebook for researchers, outlines his vision on how scientists’ lives will be transformed by wider adoption of solutions supported by artificial intelligence and the emergence of the likes of blockchain-based solutions to gain greater data reproducibility.

The science of sleep, the sleep of scientists

Sleep. We all need it. From working long hours in the lab or field, researchers often get much less sleep than the average person requires. Conducting research into the twilight hours is prevalent in all fields of science, from life science to particle physics. But the cognitively demanding tasks of conducting experiments and analysing data require a clear mind. So how do scientists manage their research—let alone their personal lives—with little rest? Here, a few scientists share lessons about sleep they have learned from their life and work.