Sophia With AGI Not Even Close to Human Intelligence

A robot that behaves or thinks like a human is called a humanoid. A robot can either be controlled directly using a controlled device or can be programmed to do specific tasks autonomously. Robots are widely used in manufacturing, assembly and packing, transport, earth and space exploration, surgery, weaponry, laboratory research, and mass production of consumer and industrial goods. The world’s first digital robot called the Unimate was invented by George Devol in 1954. It was sold to General Motors to help with the manufacturing process like lifting hot pieces of metal from a die casting machine and stacking them. But a humanoid robot was still a fiction until 1972, when the first humanoid robot called WABOT-1 was developed by Waseda University (Japan).WABOT-1 was able to walk, communicate (in japanese), grip objects, etc.

Machine learning and big data are unlocking Europe’s archives

Europe’s history is stored in billions of archival pages across the continent. While many archives try to make their documents public, finding information in them remains a low-tech affair. Simple page scans do not offer the metadata such as dates, names, locations that often interest researchers. Copying this information for later use is also time-consuming.

Radio Astronomy driving new competences and innovation on the European scale

LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) is the world’s largest and most sensitive low frequency radio telescope. It was designed, built, and is now operated by ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy. LOFAR’s reach now spans Europe – from Ireland to Poland, with the newest LOFAR antenna station being delivered to Ventspils University of Applied Sciences in Latvia. Here we propose that LOFAR is a prime example of how state-of-the-art facilities leads to the sharing and building of competencies and innovation: it is one of today’s major success stories of research infrastructures on a European scale.