Tag Archives: Open Science

Summer time: reflect, recharge and reconnect

2017, so far, has been an amazing year at EuroScientist as we are getting even more connected to our community of readers every day. For now, we hope that you will have time to reflect on your own life and recharge your batteries, during the summer. This could also be an opportunity to reconnect with the rest of our community by continuing to share and exchange through EuroScientist's comments boxes and social media networks or via the Homo scientificus europaeus community blog. We look forward to engaging with you again in September. Read more [...]
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A pan-European Scientists’ Community Promoting an Open Science in an Open World

The 2nd Homo scientificus europaeus Meeting will be organized at the Ateneu Barcelones on 16 May 2017. Its aim is to foster the creation of a large pan-European community of citizen-scientists supporting the new social contract between science and society. In the morning, representatives of grassroots associations and organisers of March-for-Science from across Europe will discuss national initiatives. They will lead to discussions about their convergence. The afternoon will focus on the concept of Science Open to Society and will feature scientists from Barcelona. The meeting, which will be streamed live on the internet to ensure a broad reach. It will conclude with a general debate on how to proceed for promoting an Open Science in an Open World. Read more [...]
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Thomas Landrain interview: short-circuiting research

In this interview with EuroScientist, Thomas Landrain explains the story of La Paillasse, the open lab he founded in Paris six years ago. He has since developed a platform aiming to do open science by involving academics from across disciplines, engineers, designers and artists as well as curious citizens from around the world. The idea is to cut out the intermediaries and create a much more open way of doing research, enabling to fast-prototype solutions to scientific problems. Read more [...]
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Uberisation of Science

With an increased reliance on geographically-distributed teams, tomorrow's researchers are going to be able to reach unprecedented scales of collaborations, not just limited to cooperation between well-funded labs. Researchers from wider afield, including from territories with lowe level of research funding, will finally be able to more systematically contribute to the great scientific endeavour of the future. This issue is not limited to the mere technicalities of working across self-organised, distributed teams. It also looks at how, for such scenario to take place, it is essential; that we change our outlook on what we mean by collaborating. This may require examining the values driving our future investigations. Read more [...]
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One cultural shift away, towards fairer science

Uberisation is happening in technology-disrupted fields. Research and innovation have not been left out. Technology-mediated interaction between geographically-distributed teams of scientists is about to happen on a much wider scale than before. And this trend is no longer limited to scientists from well-funded labs. It is now time for researchers to prepare for yet another shift in attitude when interacting with each other. They need to show greater willingness to give and share, encouraged by a new credit and reward system recognising the smallest contributions to science. Read more [...]
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Are the disruptions of uberisation a bane or boon for science?

For every characteristic of uberisation, there is a parallel in the world of research. This raises the question of whether research was "uberised" before Uber even existed? In this article EuroScientist explores which aspects in research have been most impacted by technology, and the challenges ahead to leverage uberisation for the good of science and scientists. Read more [...]
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When privacy-bound research pays for open science

Thanks to the growing uberisation of science, opportunities to participate in world class research could soon no longer be limited to researchers in well-funded labs. According to an opinion piece by Barend Mons, professor at the Leiden University Medical Centre, The Netherlands, technology has now made it possible to distribute part of the interpretation of scientific results across a geographically widespread work force, to include scientists from developing countries. In the first of a two-part contribution, he also envisions that a new business model allocating free access to those who share, and charging a premium to those who don’t, could soon disrupt research and innovation and further open science. Read more [...]
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Biological mechanisms discovery by globally-distributed research force

Not every scientist has the comfort of a well-equipped lab. However, newly available open platforms for biomedical in silico discovery could soon spark the brains of millions of researchers forming a geographically-distributed work force across the globe. This no longer requires working in a high-tech lab to contribute to the discovery of new mechanisms in health and diseases. Meanwhile, new opportunities for trainees, scientists and patients to practice annotation of genetic databases, could push the boundaries of open science towards countries where it has not yet been possible to work on such projects. In the second part of a two-part series, Barend Mons from the Leiden University Medical Centre, The Netherlands, explains how it could work in practice, and how close we are to realising this initiative. Read more [...]
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Open Science

Open Science: never have terms been interpreted in so many different ways by so many different people. The diversity of perspectives on this matter reflects the evolving nature of what research has become. These reflections led to the idea of this EuroScientist special issue together with early stage discussions with scholarly publishing experts, and journalistic investigations about what to expect from an ever opening science. Read more [...]
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A new kind of science: research in the age of big data

What is unique about research in the era of Science 2.0? For one, it opens up important new methods of discovery. But the potential gains offered by technology can only be fully realised if research becomes open. This requires scientists to share more than ever before. And this calls for a system where all contributions, down to the most minute, are given proper credit. Welcome to the era of the fourth paradigm of research! Read more [...]
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Jean-Claude Burgelman: the new open science paradigm requires fine tuning

The EC consultation on Science 2.0, whose results have recently been published, raised a number of issues that may need to be addressed before the idea of open science can fully be implemented. In particular, the need to introduce incentives in the scientific process to encourage scientists to share their data and publish in open access journals was brought up by many of the stakeholders consulted. He also sees the role of the Commission as that of a broker to create a level playing field to make it possible for open science to flourish. Read more [...]
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