Scientists’ lifestyle

Issues related to the every day life of scientists when they are not working

Raising hue and cry against a poet!

Censorship is alive and kicking. Read on about the experience of a French poet, who is also an eminent physicist, writing under the pen name Chaunes. His latest work include poems which refer to both the islamic veil and naked bodies in the same piece. Even tough few people actually read poetry. It appears that commercial online retailers have their own in-built censorship when it comes to such matters. Read more [...]
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Champagne to celebrate the 2017 window on science, policy and society

On the eve of 2017, we raise a glass of champagne--now that scientists better understand what gives it all its flavour--and invite you to engage even more than before with EuroScientist. You may approach us to tell us about how your work is changing as our society and the wider research environment change. Tell us about how you interact with policy makers and with citizens. Tell us about your dreams and your ambitions. And don't forget to share our articles within your wider circles and to comments on the articles we publish. 2017: here we come! Read more [...]
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We are largely responsible for our own happiness

Everybody is different when it comes to assessing their subjective well-being. It is likely that the differences in people’s genetic makeup contribute to long-lasting differences in their subjective well-being. Find out from Philipp Koellinger, Lars Bertram, and Gert G. Wagner, who are experts in genetic studies, about the extent to which we are responsible for our own happiness. Read more [...]
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In praise of solitude in science

Solitude often holds negative connotations. Yet, it is not necessarily a bad thing for scientists. Particularly in an hyper-connected work environment, where team collaboration and instant communications sometimes act like a smokescreen to hide the deep meaning of what scientists individual journey entails. In this deep personal reflection, Francisco Azuaje, senior researcher at the Luxembourg Institute of Health, helps us look at the true benefit of solitude in science. Read more [...]
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Does mobility boost early scientific careers?

Young scientists are expected to change country and jobs every few years on average to get a chance to progress their academic career. Mobility in science stems from a long tradition. It is favoured for bringing very enriching experiences. But post docs and their scientific work do not always benefit from mobility. Here, EuroScientist looks into how being on the move every few years affects the life of researchers and looks at ways of enhancing work/life balance. Read more [...]
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After Brexit: a day in the life of a British academic

Imagine what would happen if the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union in the referendum of the 23rd June 2016? To give our readers a better idea of the consequences of the Brexit for the country's scientists, EuroScientist has commissioned UK technology journalist Paul Hill to write a fictional day in the life of a British academic post-Brexit. This gives food for thought on the factors influencing the position of Europe's centre of gravity in research. Read more [...]
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Hollyweird Science

There is an increase in popularity of Anglo-Saxon films and TV series featuring many kinds of scientists. In an opinion piece Kevin Grazier and Stephen Cass, authors of a recently published book on the topic, called Hollyweird Science, explain how Hollywood and major TV series representing scientists have come a long way. Scientists have never been portrayed more positively. Read more [...]
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Poetry and Science: Chemistry and Buffer Life

This week we offer our readers a poem on chemistry. We are keen to invite more amateur poets to submit their verses to EuroScientist. As a community magazine, we want to share the thoughts of our readers in the many forms that it takes for people to express themselves, including through poems. So feel free to get in touch, and share your own interpretation of the world. Read more [...]
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Shifting the perspective of sceptical minds

The practice of mindfulness is not yet full recognised by the science community for the benefits it can bring to the well-being and performance of individuals. As such, it constitutes the perfect case study to identify how evidence-base can help in promoting its wider adoption. Find out about how organisations who traditionally would not necessarily have adopted such practice--like universities, investment firms, tech companies,parliaments and the army--have been convinced to pursue this avenue Read more [...]
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Poetry and Science: A Bite of the Apple

Peter Davis, regular EuroScientist contributor, is now presenting some of his latest work. In this poem A Bite of the Apple, he ponders over the overflow of publications and reminisces over the value of silence...We welcome EuroScientist readers comments and reactions. We also invite other poets to submit their work to the magazine by writing to the editor. Read more [...]
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The science of sleep, the sleep of scientists

Sleep. We all need it. From working long hours in the lab or field, researchers often get much less sleep than the average person requires. Conducting research into the twilight hours is prevalent in all fields of science, from life science to particle physics. But the cognitively demanding tasks of conducting experiments and analysing data require a clear mind. So how do scientists manage their research—let alone their personal lives—with little rest? Here, a few scientists share lessons about sleep they have learned from their life and work. Read more [...]
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