Where does scientists’ inspiration stem from?

Are scientists inspired? Where and how do they get their most pressing concerns? What fuels their innermost motivations? Is it a requirement for them to be inspired? In this insightful opinion piece, Francisco Azuaje, a senior researcher at the Luxembourg Institute of Health shares his thoughts on one of the tenets of scientific endeavour. His perspective may inspire others to comment on what makes the scientific discovery process so exciting? Read more [...]

After Brexit: a day in the life of a British academic

Imagine what would happen if the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union in the referendum of the 23rd June 2016? To give our readers a better idea of the consequences of the Brexit for the country's scientists, EuroScientist has commissioned UK technology journalist Paul Hill to write a fictional day in the life of a British academic post-Brexit. This gives food for thought on the factors influencing the position of Europe's centre of gravity in research. Read more [...]

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Inspiring findings to expand the RRI scene

As the first few RRI projects are coming to fruition, there is plenty of lessons to be shared about how best to implement the European Union policies on responsible research and innovation. In this opinion piece, the coordinators of the Go4 group of RRI projects share their recommendations on how best include RRI practice into existing research and innovation activities. Read more [...]

Uberisation of Science

With an increased reliance on geographically-distributed teams, tomorrow's researchers are going to be able to reach unprecedented scales of collaborations, not just limited to cooperation between well-funded labs. Researchers from wider afield, including from territories with lowe level of research funding, will finally be able to more systematically contribute to the great scientific endeavour of the future. This issue is not limited to the mere technicalities of working across self-organised, distributed teams. It also looks at how, for such scenario to take place, it is essential; that we change our outlook on what we mean by collaborating. This may require examining the values driving our future investigations. Read more [...]

One cultural shift away, towards fairer science

Uberisation is happening in technology-disrupted fields. Research and innovation have not been left out. Technology-mediated interaction between geographically-distributed teams of scientists is about to happen on a much wider scale than before. And this trend is no longer limited to scientists from well-funded labs. It is now time for researchers to prepare for yet another shift in attitude when interacting with each other. They need to show greater willingness to give and share, encouraged by a new credit and reward system recognising the smallest contributions to science. Read more [...]

Are the disruptions of uberisation a bane or boon for science?

For every characteristic of uberisation, there is a parallel in the world of research. This raises the question of whether research was "uberised" before Uber even existed? In this article EuroScientist explores which aspects in research have been most impacted by technology, and the challenges ahead to leverage uberisation for the good of science and scientists. Read more [...]

From Uber to OpenStreetCab: how data shifts the power back to users

Services like Uber are challenging traditional sectors such as the taxi industry. However, they may charge more than traditional taxis at time of high-demand. To counter this phenomenon, data analysis could bring full transparency in relation to taxi pricing by delivering a head-to-head comparison of all available taxis types. In this opinion piece, Anastasios Noulas, lecturer at the Data Science Institute at Lancaster University, UK, and OpenStreetCab co-founder, shares his experience of how data-driven solutions can increase transparency in tech-disrupted industries and ultimately provide better value for policy makers from publicly available data. Read more [...]

Birju Pandya interview: choosing sustainable values to drive research

In this interview with EuroScientist, Birju Pandya explains gift culture, which he has helped introduce in finance. He explains how this approach can be beneficial for any field of work but also in all aspects of our own lives. The gift culture is based on a non-transactional approach to work, which is instead replaced by trust-based approach, based on pursuing higher-order values, such as connection to community and ecology. While there will be resistance against this rewiring of the mind, the result is worth the effort. Read more [...]

Matters founder Lawrence Rajendran: the Lego approach to scientific publishing

In this interview with EuroScientist, Lawrence Rajendran explains why he created Matters, to change the way we communicate science. He has devised a new way of publishing science by submitting single observations to build the big Lego puzzle of science. He believes that the current way of presenting papers, based on storytelling, needs to be revisited as they tend to favour oversights of what could be perceived as negative results. He thinks this will to open science to allow greater multidisciplinary collaborations and to reach out to a wider audience, beyond the scientific community. Read more [...]

When privacy-bound research pays for open science

Thanks to the growing uberisation of science, opportunities to participate in world class research could soon no longer be limited to researchers in well-funded labs. According to an opinion piece by Barend Mons, professor at the Leiden University Medical Centre, The Netherlands, technology has now made it possible to distribute part of the interpretation of scientific results across a geographically widespread work force, to include scientists from developing countries. In the first of a two-part contribution, he also envisions that a new business model allocating free access to those who share, and charging a premium to those who don’t, could soon disrupt research and innovation and further open science. Read more [...]

Biological mechanisms discovery by globally-distributed research force

Not every scientist has the comfort of a well-equipped lab. However, newly available open platforms for biomedical in silico discovery could soon spark the brains of millions of researchers forming a geographically-distributed work force across the globe. This no longer requires working in a high-tech lab to contribute to the discovery of new mechanisms in health and diseases. Meanwhile, new opportunities for trainees, scientists and patients to practice annotation of genetic databases, could push the boundaries of open science towards countries where it has not yet been possible to work on such projects. In the second part of a two-part series, Barend Mons from the Leiden University Medical Centre, The Netherlands, explains how it could work in practice, and how close we are to realising this initiative. Read more [...]

European science conversations by the community, for the community