Post-Brexit plans on funding and mobility

On the 8th May 2017, one of the arm of the British scientific establishment, the Royal Institution, has opened its famous lecture theatre to a debate about Brexit. Brexit is not about extricating the UK from the European scientific endeavour. And Brexit does not bring to an end many important aspects of the integrated European scientific projects. Today, it is not obvious, however, which strategies the UK--and the other EU 27 countries--could adopt to sustain as much as possible international collaborations and mobility. In this opinion piece, representatives of EuroScience argue that scientists need to raise their voices to guarantee their future and the future of our societies. Should all negotiation fail and the UK ends up with weakened relations with the EU 27, the authors argue, it remains to be seen whether the UK plan to strengthen relations and collaborations with the US, the Commonwealth and East-Asia will be an adequate substitute. Read more [...]
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A pan-European Scientists’ Community Promoting an Open Science in an Open World

The 2nd Homo scientificus europaeus Meeting will be organized at the Ateneu Barcelones on 16 May 2017. Its aim is to foster the creation of a large pan-European community of citizen-scientists supporting the new social contract between science and society. In the morning, representatives of grassroots associations and organisers of March-for-Science from across Europe will discuss national initiatives. They will lead to discussions about their convergence. The afternoon will focus on the concept of Science Open to Society and will feature scientists from Barcelona. The meeting, which will be streamed live on the internet to ensure a broad reach. It will conclude with a general debate on how to proceed for promoting an Open Science in an Open World. Read more [...]
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South Africa’s Forgotten Dead

Every year, thousands of people are murdered in South Africa, at a rate that has been steadily increasing over the past three years. On average, some 50 people a day fall victim to violence at the hands of those motivated by rage, opportunity, or some dark compulsion it is difficult for others to imagine. In this three part series of investigative journalism, Sarah Wild explores how forensic scientists work to try and identify people from the most vulnerable groups, including women, children, and particularly illegal immigrants, many of whom “come down into South Africa, and they die in a field and no one is looking”, according to one forensic scientist. She then explore how they eventually get buried. Read more [...]
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South Africa’s unidentified dead

One in 10 people who pass through South Africa's Gauteng’s mortuaries is not identified. Eventually, when no one comes for them and they cannot safely be kept any longer, they are carted off en masse to a public graveyard, buried without names, and with no one to mourn them. Once in the ground, their chances of being identified and exhumed dwindle to almost nothing. Read the first part of a three part series of investigative journalism highlighting the role of forensic science in dealing with South Africa's forgotten dead. Read more [...]
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Identifying South Africa’s forgotten dead

If it wasn’t for the smell, no one would know there was a body there. The savannah grass reaches above the waists of passers-by sweating under South Africa's Gauteng summer sun. There is no data on how many of Gauteng’s 15 000 to 16 500 annual unnatural deaths are found in this way but the occurrence is common enough for these bodies to have their own moniker among the officials who dread having to deal with them: veld bodies. In the second part of a three-part investigative journalism series, we explore how forensic scientists work to identify these dead bodies. Read more [...]
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Burying the forgotten dead

Forty unclaimed bodies are to be buried in Doornkop cemetery in Soweto on this particular Tuesday morning. An undertaker confers with an official as they cross names and numbers off a list. Two men lean against bright yellow earthmovers, waiting for their cue in this burial scene. Authorities know who the people are but no family has collected the bodies for burial. The last of a three part series of articles investigating South Africa's forgotten dead focused on how unclaimed bodies eventually get buried. Read more [...]
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Michal Kosinski Interview: making our post-privacy world a habitable place

EuroScientist recently attended the CeBIT in Hannover, Germany, where dicussion on privacy where top of the agenda. Invited speaker Michal Kosinski, who is now assistant professor of organisational behaviour at Stanford graduate shcool of business, California, USA, shares his lates work in a podcast. He also discusses the most practical approaches to make life in our post-privacy era comfortable. Find out more in this exclusive podcast. Read more [...]
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Breaking grounds in research and innovation through Indo-European partnerships

India and the European Union have become important research and innovation partners over the past years. One of the most important areas of cooperation is Science, Technology and Innovation. EU-funded projects such as INNO INDGIO and INDIGO POLICY will present final results at a conference on 26th April 2017 in Ghent, Belgium, that will include discussions with a panel of high profile European and Indian experts. The event is aimed at stakeholders from policy & programme management level, who are involved in EU-India Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation. Read more [...]
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March for Science 2017- EuroScientist storify

EuroScientist is relying on its network of correspondents across Europe to give you an account of the March for Science on Storify. You will be able to read the reactions of our community on the days prior and after the event. This will convey the spirit of how people are to experience this unique mobilisation of scientists from across Europe. Feel free to join in and share your experience by including @EuroScientist in your tweets to attract the attention of our curator. Read more [...]
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Seed Control

From 16% twenty years ago to over 70% today. Our food security may be controlled by a small group, fewer than 10 very large corporations. They decide prices, varieties, conditions of growth. They manage patents and intellectual property rights. They make agreements with governments and public institutions. And they have a strong influence on regulations, laws and treaties. In this three-part series, EuroScientist, publishes the outcome of a data and science journalism investigation, which opens the discussion about the interaction between industry and farmers in the global seeds business. This makes for fascinating reading. Read more [...]
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European science conversations by the community, for the community