Work-life Balance

Welcome to our special issue of EuroScientist on work-life balance. This is a very timely issue for January as everybody start making plans for the year ahead. We have a unique selection of articles to share with EuroScientist readers the kind of extremes of work pressure that scientists can be subjected to. In another section of this special issue, we explore the kind of solutions that have yet to be implemented to make life easier for scientists. And finally, we provide you with a reflection on how scientists’ private life is portrayed in films. Read more [...]

Work-life balance on hold, for the love of science

A flavour of the life of some scientists working in extreme conditions shows how work-life balance is heavily tilted towards work. Yet, there are ways to preserve a sense of down time and enjoy the extreme beauty of these remote places. Above all this sort of human experience will make scientists involved stronger and better equipped to face future life and career challenges. Read more [...]

Inadequate childcare policies affect scientists’ careers

The inadequacy of childcare policies across Europe, means that scientists who do not wish to be away from their lab for too long are struggling to balance their life as parents and as researchers. There are still some significant decisions concerning harmonisation of such childcare provision to be made in Europe, while further policy support would be welcome. Read more [...]

Personal options in science careers

To reach a work/life balance, scientists need to learn how to create options. They need new ways of understanding how we invest in time, money or energy. They, also need to think carefully about the communities within which we are embedded. It is therefore essential to know how to make career decisions in conditions of uncertainty, by weighting the relative benefits of options. Read more [...]

Forget citations for unbiased research evaluation

To what extent the success of scientific articles is due to social influence? A recent study analyses a data set of over 100,000 publications authored by more than 160,000 authors in the field of computer science. The authors provide the first large-scale study of the relation between the notion of centrality of authors in the co-authorship network and the future success of their publications. This leads the authors, who specialise in data driven modelling of complex systems at the Chair of Systems Design at ETH Zurich, in Switzerland, to predict with high precision whether an article will be highly cited five years after publication. Such insight into the social dimension of scientific publishing challenges the perception of citations being an objective, socially unbiased measure of scientific success. Read more [...]

When tech meets fashion

Fashion is not commonly associated with science and technology. However, there has always been a close connection between these fields. Exploring the way both fields have evolved, finding synergies, brings some interesting insights into how technology can have a direct influence on the way people live. But it could also impinge on their right to privacy. Read more [...]

Je suis Charlie

Today on the publication of the first issue of Charlie Hebdo after the massacre, last week, we publish a poem in French by Chaunes to demonstrate our support to all affected in this tragedy. Values of tolerance and freedom of speech are paramount to the world of tomorrow that is being built by our readers' community. EuroScientist too can say: JeSuisCharlie! Read more [...]

Charlie Hebdo massacre: intellectuals in the line of fire

Imagine that you have been sentenced to death by a self-righteous group because of your ideas. This could happen to any of you. As a researcher, imagine that you have been unveiling some fascinating counter-intuitive views on what has been the life of prophet Mohamed in ancient times. Or you could have been doing sociological studies of how well integrated and active second generation Muslim women are in Western society. Or any other scientific work that goes against the views of some ultra-minority of extremists. What happened yesterday, 7th January 201, in Paris is only one step removed from such scenario. Read more [...]

Innovator travels convoluted path to therapy trial

Read about the challenges that Stephane Huberty, an entrepreneur who is also a medical doctor, since he was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG). This article accounts of the many meanders that he had to face on the path to bringing a disruptive innovation--a vaccine for MG--towards the market. This demonstrates that in innovation circles, there is no one-size-fits-all and that some innovations may not quite fit the existing innovation system as expected. Read more [...]

Happy New Year 2015 to EuroScientist readers

It is the time of the year where we would like to wish EuroScientist readers a wonderful, amazing, exceptional and superb New Year 2015. Now that everybody is coming back to work, we would love to hear from you. So tell us about your dreams, your hopes and what keeps you awake at night. We will do our best to cover stories related to the issues that matter most to you. Read more [...]

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